Professional Educational Seminars

ABSTRACT

     Average models that run on general purpose circuit simulators, can help to understand the large signal and small signal behavior of switch mode systems, and can assist in the design and trimming of the power stage and controller. The objective of the proposed seminar is to present a unified methodology for average modeling and simulation of Active Power Factor Correction (APFC) systems and to demonstrate its use in analysis and design. 

The introductory part of the seminar covers the basics of the Generalized Switch Inductor Model (GSIM). In the following section, the seminar will introduce new behavioral models of APFC systems operating in continuous, discontinuous and borderline current modes. Both control methods with and without sensing of input voltage will be presented. It will be shown how these large signal models can be used, as is, to obtain the large signal as well as the small signal responses. It will also be demonstrated how the models can be easily applied to obtain the inner and outer loop-gain of the APFC stages. The seminar will discuss in details the application of the models in the analysis and design of APFC systems including the synthesis of phase compensation networks to meet bandwidth and phase margin requirements. 


 

 

Computer Aided Analysis and Design

of Single Phase APFC Stages

 

 

Instructors: Prof. Sam Ben-Yaakov, Ben-Gurion University
Ilya Zeltser, Green Power Technologies Ltd., Israel

 

 

Outline

 

1.     Overview of simulation methods                                                   10min.

2.     The averaging methodology                                                         40min.

2.1. Duty Cycle Generator (DCG)

2.2. Large and small signal analyses

2.3. Examples

3.     Continuous Conduction Mode (CCM) APFC stages                       

3.1. Classical (Unitrode) method                                                   40min.

3.1.1.   Behavioral model derivation

3.1.2.   Large signal analysis

3.1.3.   Input current spectrum analysis

3.1.4.   AC analysis

3.1.4.1.                  Operating point derivation

3.1.4.2.                  Current loop gain and transfer function derivation

3.1.4.3.                  Voltage loop gain and transfer function derivation

3.1.4.4.                  Analyzing results using Bode plot, Nyquist plot and     

                     Nichols chart

3.2. Method with no sensing of input voltage                                  30min.

3.2.1.   Principle of operation

3.2.2.   Large signal analysis

3.2.3.   AC analysis

3.2.3.1.                  Operating point derivation

3.2.3.2.                  Current and voltage loop analysis

4.     Critical Conduction Mode APFC stages                                        

4.1. Classical (Two control loops) method                                     25min.

4.1.1.   Behavioral model derivation

4.1.2.   Large signal analysis

4.2. Method with no sensing of input current                                  25min.

4.2.1.   Behavioral model derivation

4.2.2.   Large signal analysis

5.     Conclusions and Q&A                                                                  10min.

 

Control Design of PWM Converters: The User Friendly Approach

Computer Aided Analysis and Design of Single Phase APFC Stages

 

Feedback Design in Operational Amplifiers and  PWM Converters:

The User Friendly Approach

 

Fundamentals of PWM Converters

 

Introduction to CMOS Operational Amplifiers

 

Control Design of PWM Converters:

 The Intuitive Approach

 

Fundumentals of PWM Converters

 

Computer Aided design of Power Factor Correction Systems

 

Power Electronics of Piezoelectric Elements

Introduction to Power Management for Portables

Dynamics and Stability of Switch Mode Converters

Modern Soft Switched Converter Topologies

 

Control Design of PWM Converters: The User Friendly Approach

Switched Capacitors Converters

 

Essentials of Switch Mode Converters

 

מגברי שרת מודרניים

Power Electronics of Piezoelectric Elements

 

Digital Control Design of PWM Converters: The Time-Domain Approach